Freshwater crustaceans in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic lakes
Latest version published by Museo Nacional de Historia Natural on 11 November 2020 Museo Nacional de Historia Natural

This checklist resource was created derived from our published paper, which was based on two major literature reviews in freshwater crustaceans: Pugh et al. 2002 and Dartnall 2017. These two former papers contained all the available information to date, but we also checked for suspect records, possible synonymies, and changes in scientific names. In our paper we explored the distribution of freshwater crustaceans, one of the most abundant and diverse group of organisms in Antarctic and Subantarctic lakes, across four biogeographic provinces: Continental Antarctic, Maritime Antarctic, Subantarctic Islands, and Southern Cool Temperate. Based on the literature, we evaluate biogeography, spatial autocorrelation among regions (in relation to dispersal) and climate as possible drivers for freshwater crustaceans species distribution.

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Data Records

The data in this checklist resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 127 records.

2 extension data tables also exist. An extension record supplies extra information about a core record. The number of records in each extension data table is illustrated below.

  • Taxon (core)
    127
  • Distribution 
    127
  • Occurrence 
    127

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 127 records in English (29 kB) - Update frequency: as needed
Metadata as an EML file download in English (37 kB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (20 kB)
Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Maturana C S, Díaz A, Merino C (2020): Freshwater crustaceans in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic lakes. v1.5. Museo Nacional de Historia Natural. Dataset/Checklist. doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-44290-4

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Museo Nacional de Historia Natural. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: b577bbff-2ed4-40ff-9690-ff3da147775b.  Museo Nacional de Historia Natural publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by GBIF Chile.

Keywords

Checklist; Antarctic; sub-Antarctic islands; freshwater; crustaceans; Derivedfromoccurrence

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Claudia S. Maturana
PhD Student
Universidad de Chile - Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity
Las Palmeras 3425
7800003 Santiago
Nunoa
CL
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Claudia_Maturana2
Angie Díaz
Professor
Universidad de Concepcion
Barrio Universitario s/n
Concepcion
CL
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/A_Diaz
Catalina Merino
Collection Manager
Museo Nacional de Historia Natural
Santiago
CL
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Catalina_Merino-Yunnissi

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Claudia S. Maturana
PhD Student
Universidad de Chile - Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity
Las Palmeras 3425
7800003 Santiago
Nunoa
CL
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Claudia_Maturana2
Angie Díaz
Professor
Universidad de Concepcion
Barrio Universitario s/n
Concepcion
CL
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/A_Diaz

Who filled in the metadata:

Claudia S. Maturana
PhD Student
Universidad de Chile - Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity
Las Palmeras 3425
7800003 Santiago
Nunoa
CL
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Claudia_Maturana2
Angie Díaz
Professor
Universidad de Concepcion
Barrio Universitario s/n
Concepcion
CL
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/A_Diaz
Catalina Merino
Collection Manager
Museo Nacional de Historia Natural
Santiago
CL
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Catalina_Merino-Yunnissi

Who else was associated with the resource:

Editor
Catalina Merino
Collection Manager
Museo Nacional de Historia Natural
Santiago
CL
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Catalina_Merino-Yunnissi
Author
Claudia S. Maturana
PhD Student
Universidad de Chile - Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity
Las Palmeras 3425
7800003 Santiago
Nunoa
CL
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Claudia_Maturana2
Author
Angie Díaz
Geographic Coverage

We include the Antarctic continent which was divided into 3 biogeographic provinces: the continental Antarctic (CA), comprising the continent landmass south of 72ºS and the Balleny Islands; the maritime Antarctic (MA), which includes the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula north of 72°S; and the sub-Antarctic (SA), which comprises a series of islands and small archipelagos in the Southern Ocean proximate to the zone of Antarctic Polar Front (APF). Besides, we considered a fourth biogeographic province, north of the APF: the Southern Cool Temperate (SCT) province, which is formed by several islands from New Zealand and South America.

Bounding Coordinates South West [-90, -180], North East [-58.078, -178.594]
Taxonomic Coverage

All crustaceans were identified at the genus or species level in the original publications (Pugh et al. 2002 and Dartnall 2017) and belong to the following classes: Branchiopoda, Hexanauplia, Malacostraca and Ostracoda.

Species  Branchinecta gaini,  Alona guttata,  Alona quadrangularis,  Camptocercus aloniceps,  Camptocercus rectirostris,  Chydorus patagonicus,  Chydorus sphaericus,  Daphnia gelida,  Daphnia pulex,  Daphniopsis studeri,  Ceriodaphnia silvestrii,  Ilyocryptus brevidentatus,  Macrothrix boergeni,  Macrothrix flagellata,  Macrothrix laticornis,  Macrothrix ruehei,  Macrothrix oviformis,  Macrothrix sp.,  Ovalona weinecki,  Pleuroxus macquariensis,  Pleuroxus wittsteini,  Eubosmina coregoni,  Candona sp.,  Chlamydotheca pestai,  Chlamydotheca symmetrica,  Cypretta sp.,  Eucypris corpulenta,  Eucypris fontana,  Eucypris virens,  Ilyodromus kerguelensis,  Neocypridopsis frigogena,  Tanycypris sp.,  Candonopsis falklandica,  Newnhamia patagonica,  Boeckella poppei,  Boeckella michaelseni,  Boeckella brevicaudata,  Boeckella vallentini,  Boeckella sp.,  Gladioferens antarcticus,  Parabroteas sarsi,  Acanthocyclops michaelseni,  Acanthocyclops robustus,  Acanthocyclops vernalis,  Diacyclops mirnyi,  Diacyclops joycei,  Diacyclops kaupi,  Diacyclops walkeri,  Mixocyclops crozetensis,  Paracyclops chiltoni,  Antarctobiotus koenigi,  Epactophanes richardi,  Marionobiotus jeanneli,  Marionobiotus sp.,  Tigriopus angulatus,  Attheyella (D.) trigonura,  Antarctobiotus robustus,  Kergueleniola macra,  Pseudingolfiella possessionis,  Chiltonia mihiwaka,  Hyalella curvispina,  Hyalella neonoma,  Falklandella obtusa,  Praefalklandella cuspidatus,  Iais sp.
Subspecies  Tropocyclops prasinus prasinus
Temporal Coverage
Start Date 2002-06-02
Start Date 2017-06-02
Project Data

Antarctic and Subantarctic lakes are unique ecosystems with relatively simple food webs, which are likely to be strongly affected by climate warming. While Antarctic freshwater invertebrates are adapted to extreme environmental conditions, little is known about the factors determining their current distribution and to what extent this is explained by biogeography or climate. We explored the distribution of freshwater crustaceans across four biogeographic provinces based on the literature, predicting that species distribution would be determined by biogeography, spatial autocorrelation among regions and climate. We found that variation in species composition was largely explained by the joint effect of spatial autocorrelation and climate, with little effect of biogeography – only regions within the sub-Antarctic province had a clearly distinct species composition. This highlights a plausible main influence of crustacean dispersal – mainly through migratory seabirds – and suggests that some regions will be more affected by climate warming than others, possibly in relation to the existence of nearby sources of colonists.

Title Spatial distribution of freshwater crustaceans in Antarctic and Subantarctic lakes
Identifier doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-44290-4
Funding PIA CONICYT ACT172065, P05-002 ICM, CONICYT PIA APOYO CCTE AFB170008 from Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity (IEB), to AD and CM, CONICYT Ph.D. Grant 21150317, INACH DT_04-16 to CM and Fondecyt 11190906 to AD
Study Area Description The Antarctic continent can be divided into 3 biogeographic provinces which differ considerably in climatic conditions: the continental Antarctic, which is the largest and coldest region with temperature rarely above freezing, comprising the continent landmass south of 72ºS and the Balleny Islands; the maritime Antarctic, which includes the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula north of 72°S and experiences seasonal snowmelt; and the sub-Antarctic, which comprises a series of islands and small archipelagos in the Southern Ocean proximate to the zone of Antarctic Polar Front (APF), with temperatures that on average are above freezing point year-round. Besides, we considered a fourth biogeographic province, north of the APF and influenced by low temperatures: the southern cool temperate province, which is formed by several islands from New Zealand and South America, with cool to cold temperate climate.
Design Description We elaborated a presence/absence matrix of all freshwater crustacean species reported for Antarctic and Subantarctic lakes, based on two major literature reviews (Pugh et al. 2002 and Dartnall 2017), which contained all the available information to date. We divided each biogeographic province into regions following the above two reviews: continental Antarctic comprised the Enderby (30ºE–90ºE), Wilkes (90ºE–150ºE) and Scott (150ºE–150ºW) sectors; maritime Antarctic included the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland Islands and South Orkney Islands; Subantarctic islands included South Georgia, Prince Edward Island, Iles Crozet, Iles Kerguelen, Heard Island, and Southern Cool Temperate included Campbell Island and Auckland Island from New Zealand and Falkland from South Atlantic ocean. We excluded suspect records from the dataset, ruled out possible synonymies, and updated scientific names. We assumed that sampling effort of different taxa was similar across sites, although potential differences may have some influence on our results.

The personnel involved in the project:

Author
Claudia S. Maturana
Sampling Methods

We elaborated a presence/absence matrix of all freshwater crustacean species reported for Antarctic and Subantarctic lakes, based on two major literature reviews, which contained all the available information to date. We divided each biogeographic province into regions following the above two reviews: continental Antarctica comprised the En (30ºE–90ºE), Wi (90ºE–150ºE) and Sc (150ºE–150ºW) sectors; maritime Antarctica included the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland Islands and South Orkeny Islands; sun-Antarctic islands included South Georgia, Prince Edward, Macquarie, Heard, Crozet and Kerguelen Islands; and Southern Cool Temperate included Campebell and Auckland Islands from New Zealand and Falkland from South Atlantic ocean.

Study Extent The Antarctic continent can be divided into 3 biogeographic provinces which differ considerably in climatic conditions: the continental Antarctic, which is the largest and coldest region with temperature rarely above freezing, comprising the continent landmass south of 72ºS and the Balleny Islands; the maritime Antarctic, which includes the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula north of 72°S and experiences seasonal snowmelt; and the sub-Antarctic, which comprises a series of islands and small archipelagos in the Southern Ocean proximate to the zone of Antarctic Polar Front (APF), with temperatures that on average are above freezing point year-round. Besides, we considered a fourth biogeographic province, north of the APF and influenced by low temperatures: the southern cool temperate province, which is formed by several islands from New Zealand and South America, with cool to cold temperate climate.
Quality Control We excluded suspect records from the dataset, ruled out possible synonymies, and updated scientific names. We assumed that sampling effort of different taxa was similar across sites, although potential differences may have some influence on our results.

Method step description:

  1. We explored the influence of biogeography on regional species composition using hierarchical cluster analysis integrated with similarity profile analysis in SIMPROF and metric multidimensional scaling, MDS based on a similarity matrix using the Jaccard index. We tested for significance of the different groups of regions generated by cluster analysis using one-way ANOSIM, with biogeographic province as factor, followed by pairwise tests. Further, we identified the main species associated with each group through SIMPER based on the presence/absence matrix of crustacean species. These analyses were done using Primer v.6 software. We explored the separate and joint influence of spatial autocorrelation among regions and climate using pRDA. The amount of variation explained by each factor and by their shared contribution was calculated by variance partitioning analysis, which is based on adjusted R2 (R2adj), and their statistical significance tested through permutation tests (999 randomizations). Species composition data was Hellinger-transformed prior to analysis to provide an unbiased estimate of variance partitioning based on RDA. Spatial autocorrelation was obtained with the eigenfunction analysis known as Principal Coordinates of Neighbor Matrix PCNM, which created 10 spatial variables (PCNM vectors) based on a matrix of Euclidean distances between regions calculated using the geographic coordinates. These vectors allow the representation of different spatial relationships among regions at different spatial scales and can be treated as independent variables. As we were not able to obtain consistent climatic data for all the study regions – there are relatively few meteorological stations in Antarctica and any gross estimate based on different data sources could be misleading –, we used decimal latitude as surrogate for climate. To eliminate any effect caused by different elevations, we used the residuals of a linear regression with latitude (as a response variable) against elevation (as a predictor) in the analysis. Elevation was obtained from www.gps-coordinates.net based on latitude and longitude. These analyses were performed on R v. 3.5.1, using the functions rda, varpart, anova.cca and pcnm from vegan package.
Bibliographic Citations
  1. Dartnall, H. J. G. The freshwater fauna of the South Polar region: A 140-year review. Papers and Proceeding of the Royal Society of Tasmania 151, 19-58 (2017) doi:10.26749/rstpp.151.19
  2. Pugh, P. J. A., Dartnall, H. J. G. & Mcinnes, S. J. The non-marine Crustacea of Antarctica and the Islands of the Southern Ocean: biodiversity and biogeography. Journal of Natural History 36, 1047-1103 (2002) doi:10.1080/00222930110039602
  3. Díaz A, Maturana CS, Boyero L, De Los Rios Escalante P, Tonin AM, Correa-Araneda F. Spatial distribution of freshwater crustaceans in Antarctic and Subantarctic lakes. Sci Rep. 2019;9(1):7928. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-44290-4. PubMed PMID: 31138844. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44290-4
Additional Metadata
Purpose This resource was derived as part of our published paper (Diaz et al. 2019) in which we used two review papers of freshwater crustacean occurrence in the Continental Antarctic, Maritime Antarctic, sub-Antarctic islands, and Southern Cool Temperate Islands. Although the sampling records and original data are from other cited publications, we decided to publish the species checklist that we used for our analyses to become available in this Open Science Framework online repository.
Alternative Identifiers b577bbff-2ed4-40ff-9690-ff3da147775b
http://gbif-chile.mma.gob.cl/ipt/resource?r=freshwater_crustaceans_in_the_southern_ocean