OCCURRENCE

Benthic marine mollusks of the Strait of Magellan, Chile (Polyplacophora, Gastropoda, Bivalvia): a historical review of Natural History

Latest version published by Universidad de Magallanes on 09 September 2020 Universidad de Magallanes
An increase in richness of benthic marine mollusks has been described in the Pacific coast of Chile towards high latitudes in recent decades. This considerable increase in diversity occurs specifically at the beginning of the Magellanic Biogeographic Province. Within this province lies the Strait of Magellan, considered the most important channel because it connects the South Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. These characteristics make an interesting area for marine research, thus the Strait of Magellan has historically been the area with the greatest research effort within the Province. However, despite the efforts there is no comprehensive and updated list of the diversity of mollusks within the Strait of Magellan up to now. This study consisted of a complete bibliographic review of all avail... More
Publication date:
09 September 2020
License:
CC-BY-NC 4.0

Description

An increase in richness of benthic marine mollusks has been described in the Pacific coast of Chile towards high latitudes in recent decades. This considerable increase in diversity occurs specifically at the beginning of the Magellanic Biogeographic Province. Within this province lies the Strait of Magellan, considered the most important channel because it connects the South Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. These characteristics make an interesting area for marine research, thus the Strait of Magellan has historically been the area with the greatest research effort within the Province. However, despite the efforts there is no comprehensive and updated list of the diversity of mollusks within the Strait of Magellan up to now. This study consisted of a complete bibliographic review of all available literature that included samples of mollusks in the Strait of Magellan. More than 300 articles were reviewed, covering 200 years of scientific knowledge. There were 2579 records belonging to 412 taxa, of which 347 are valid species. Of the total valid species, 44 (~13%) are considered with doubtful presence in the Strait. This work increases the richness of mollusks of the Strait of Magellan by 228%; it is also the first report that integrates all available diversity studies of the three most speciose classes of benthic mollusk (Gastropoda, Bivalvia and Polyplacophora) from the Strait of Magellan.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 2,579 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 2,579 records in English (143 kB) - Update frequency: unknown
Metadata as an EML file download in English (39 kB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (18 kB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Aldea C, Alcaino S, Novoa L, Rosenfeld S (2019): Benthic marine mollusks of the Strait of Magellan, Chile (Polyplacophora, Gastropoda, Bivalvia): a historical review of Natural History. v1. Universidad de Magallanes. Dataset/Occurrence. http://gbif-chile.mma.gob.cl/ipt/resource?r=moluscos-estrecho-magallanes&v=1.0

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Universidad de Magallanes. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC-BY-NC) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 204130fb-8924-4601-b015-69411d9d7917.  Universidad de Magallanes publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by GBIF Chile.

Keywords

Occurrence; literature; Magellanic Biogeographic Province; South Pacific; South Atlantic; species richness; benthos; Mollusca; Observation

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Cristian Aldea
Academic
Universidad de Magallanes
Av. Bulnes 01890
6200000 Punta Arenas
Non-US/Non-Canadian
CL
Sebastián Rosenfeld
Researcher
Universidad de Magallanes
Av. Bulnes 01890
6200000 Punta Arenas
Non-US/Non-Canadian
CL
Leslie Novoa
Profesional
Universidad de Magallanes
Av. Bulnes 01890
6200000 Punta Arenas
Non-US/Non-Canadian
CL
Samuel Alcaino
Student
Universidad de Magallanes
Av. Bulnes 01890
6200000 Punta Arenas
Non-US/Non-Canadian
CL

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Cristian Aldea
Academic
Universidad de Magallanes
Av. Bulnes 01890
6200000 Punta Arenas
Non-US/Non-Canadian
CL
Sebastián Rosenfeld
Researcher
Universidad de Magallanes
Av. Bulnes 01890
6200000 Punta Arenas
Non-US/Non-Canadian
CL

Who filled in the metadata:

Cristian Aldea
Academic
Universidad de Magallanes
Av. Bulnes 01890
6200000 Punta Arenas
Non-US/Non-Canadian
CL

Who else was associated with the resource:

User
Cristian Aldea
Academic
Universidad de Magallanes
Av. Bulnes 01890
6200000 Punta Arenas
Non-US/Non-Canadian
CL

Geographic Coverage

One of the most important channels in the Magellanic Province is the Strait of Magellan, where most historical reports of mollusks are focused. This extensive channel connects the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans and is considered the most important one of the province. It is influenced by water masses of the Pacific, Atlantic and Southern Oceans, and it possess several geological characteristics derived from the last glaciation (Antezana 1999).

Bounding Coordinates South West [-54.2, -74.967], North East [-52.217, -68]

Taxonomic Coverage

To make the list of mollusks as complete as possible, information was gathered from all the available scientific publications that have sampled or reviewed benthic marine mollusks in the Magellanic Province, from the expedition of the HMS Beagle in the 19th century (King and Broderip 1832) to the present. A total of 323 articles were reviewed, of which 146 contained species within the Magellanic Province. The records and their respective geographical positions were entered into a spreadsheet structured with the Darwin Core Standard (Wieczorek et al. 2012), adjusted taxonomically according to the MolluscaBase (2019) and the revisions of classification and systematics of gastropods (Bouchet et al. 2017), bivalves (Nevesskaja 2009) and polyplacophorans (Sirenko 2006).

Class  Gastropoda,  Bivalvia,  Polyplacophora
Superfamily  Seguenzioidea
Family  Acanthochitonidae,  Callochitonidae,  Chitonidae,  Hemiarthridae,  Ischnochitonidae,  Leptochitonidae,  Mopaliidae,  Acteonidae,  Aeolidiidae,  Anatomidae,  Borsoniidae,  Buccinidae,  Cadlinidae,  Caecidae,  Calliostomatidae,  Calyptraeidae,  Cancellariidae,  Capulidae,  Chromodorididae,  Cimidae,  Cochliopidae,  Colloniidae,  Coryphellidae,  Cuthonidae,  Cylichnidae,  Cymatiidae,  Diaphanidae,  Discodorididae,  Dorididae,  Drilliidae,  Eatoniellidae,  Epitoniidae,  Eubranchidae,  Facelinidae,  Fissurellidae,  Goniodorididae,  Hydrobiidae,  Lepetidae,  Limapontiidae,  Littorinidae,  Lottiidae,  Mangeliidae,  Mathildidae,  Muricidae,  Nacellidae,  Nassariidae,  Naticidae,  Newtoniellidae,  Onchidiidae,  Onchidorididae,  Plakobranchidae,  Pleurobranchidae,  Polyceridae,  Pyramidellidae,  Raphitomidae,  Ringiculidae,  Rissoidae,  Scissurellidae,  Siphonariidae,  Tegulidae,  Tritoniidae,  Trochidae,  Turbinidae,  Velutinidae,  Volutidae,  Arcidae,  Astartidae,  Cardiidae,  Carditidae,  Condylocardiidae,  Cuspidariidae,  Cyamiidae,  Cyclochlamydidae,  Gaimardiidae,  Hiatellidae,  Lasaeidae,  Limidae,  Limopsidae,  Lucinidae,  Lyonsiellidae,  Lyonsiidae,  Mactridae,  Malletiidae,  Myidae,  Mytilidae,  Neilonellidae,  Neoleptonidae,  Nuculanidae,  Nuculidae,  Pandoridae,  Pectinidae,  Pharidae,  Philobryidae,  Pholadidae,  Propeamussiidae,  Sareptidae,  Siliculidae,  Solemyidae,  Tellinidae,  Teredinidae,  Thyasiridae,  Tindariidae,  Ungulinidae,  Veneridae,  Yoldiidae

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 1826-01-01 / 2019-01-01

Project Data

Diversity of benthic molluscs and crustaceans in the Strait of Magellan: biogeography, nestedness and comparative endemism in the Magellan Biogeographic Province

Title Diversidad de moluscos y crustáceos bentónicos en el Estrecho de Magallanes: biogeografía, ordenamiento y endemismo comparativo en la Provincia Biogeográfica Magallánica
Identifier Código PR-06-CRN-18
Funding VRIP-UMAG
Study Area Description The Strait of Magellan is a ~ 580km bi-oceanic corridor. Morphologically, the Strait of Magellan has been subdivided into three main micro-basins: eastern, central (Paso Ancho) and western.

The personnel involved in the project:

Principal Investigator
Cristian Aldea
Author
Sebastián Rosenfeld

Sampling Methods

To make the list of mollusks as complete as possible, information was gathered from all the available scientific publications that have sampled or reviewed benthic marine mollusks in the Magellanic Province, from the expedition of the HMS Beagle in the 19th century (King and Broderip 1832) to the present. A total of 323 articles were reviewed, of which 146 contained species within the Magellanic Province. The records and their respective geographical positions were entered into a spreadsheet structured with the Darwin Core Standard (Wieczorek et al. 2012), adjusted taxonomically according to the MolluscaBase (2019) and the revisions of classification and systematics of gastropods (Bouchet et al. 2017), bivalves (Nevesskaja 2009) and polyplacophorans (Sirenko 2006).

Study Extent One of the most important channels in the Magellanic Province is the Strait of Magellan, where most historical reports of mollusks are focused. This extensive channel connects the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans and is considered the most important one of the province. It is influenced by water masses of the Pacific, Atlantic and Southern Oceans, and it possess several geological characteristics derived from the last glaciation (Antezana 1999).

Method step description:

  1. The Strait of Magellan was divided into 420 quadrants of 6x6 minutes of latitude and longitude. The records located within this area were analyzed (Fig. 1), taking into account their georeference or approximate location. This analysis was developed using a tools for Google Earth (http://www.earthpoint.us), which transforms XLS extension files (Excel format) to KML (files that contains geographic data). In total, 108 articles provided records for the Strait of Magellan. Dubious records were counted and also the species that were recorded only once in history. Criteria were followed to determine which species records are doubtful: species that were cited once and later questioned in taxonomic revisions or never reported again; species that greatly exceed their distribution limit and do not appear in taxonomic revisions or alpha diversity studies; and species that have a huge geographical discontinuity and are not explained or figured in the article. A new matrix was elaborated with the Darwin Core standard from the database, with presence-absence data of each taxon per quadrant entered as 1 or 0, respectively. The quadrants with no species were removed from the matrix and the species considered doubtful and the taxa with imprecise locations were not included in the matrix. However, these were considered in the quantification of total richness. On the other hand, the records up to or above genus level (registered as "indet." or "sp.") were not considered as valid species for both species richness values and estimation models, except for those in which the author commented that it could be a new species.

Bibliographic Citations

  1. Antezana T (1999) Hydrographic features of Magellan and Fuegian inland passages and adjacent Subantarctic waters. Scientia Marina 63(S1): 23–34.
  2. Bouchet P, Rocroi J, Hausdorf B, Kaim A, Kano Y, Nützel A, Parkhaev P, Schrödl M Strong E (2017) Revised classification, nomenclator and typification of gastropod and monoplacophoran families. Malacologia, 61 (1–2), 1–526.
  3. King PP, Broderip WJ (1832) Description of the Cirripedia, Conchifera and Mollusca, in a collection formed by the officers of H.M.S. Adventure and Beagle employed between the years 1826 and 1830 in surveying the southern coasts of South America. Zoological Journal 5: 332–349.
  4. MolluscaBase eds. (2019) MolluscaBase. Accessed at http://www.molluscabase.org on 2019-07-31.
  5. Nevesskaja L (2009) Principles of systematics and the system of bivalves. Paleontological Journal, 43 (1): 1–11.
  6. Sirenko BI (2006) New Outlook оn the System of Chitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora). Venus, 65 (1–2): 27–49.
  7. Wieczorek J, Bloom D, Guralnick R, Blum S, Döring M, Giovanni R, Robertson T, Vieglais D (2012) Darwin Core: An evolving community-developed biodiversity data standard. PloS ONE 7(1): e29715.

Additional Metadata

Aldea C, Novoa L, Alcaino S, Rosenfeld S (2020) Diversity of benthic marine mollusks of the Strait of Magellan, Chile (Polyplacophora, Gastropoda, Bivalvia): a historical review of natural history. ZooKeys 963: 1-36. https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.963.52234

Alternative Identifiers 204130fb-8924-4601-b015-69411d9d7917
http://gbif-chile.mma.gob.cl/ipt/resource?r=moluscos-estrecho-magallanes